*Thanks everyone!* It has been helpful to have some

DWQA Questions*Thanks everyone!* It has been helpful to have some

*Thanks everyone!* It has been helpful to have some advice and to feel like we aren’t alone in this. I’m worried we have some serious repairs coming our way. I’ve got a plumber and roofer coming out to get started on those things. Foundation is the big one. We are going to have several companies to come and check it out, as well as as structural engineer.

We bought a flipped house and I feel like I’m going to lose it. We can’t get the roof leak figured out, the kitchen sink keeps leaking, the shower leaks onto the wall causing mold, the floors are settling, the kitchen cabinets are falling because of the floors (we lifted them last year and it fixed it, but it’s doing it again), the yard has weeds, we need a retainer wall, the kitchen has some functionality issues, as does the laundry area….what were we thinking?! I feel so stressed about it all. We didn’t have a bunch of money at the time, and it seemed like we could fix a lot od things, but then it just keeps adding up. Anybody else in the same boat and want to whine with me?

*Thanks everyone!* It has been helpful to have some 1

28 Answers
Best Answer
answered 7 days ago

Our house was flipped. There have been so many funky issues. Water in the FINISHED basement was the biggest one, which I think we’ve finally solved. They had the dryer venting into the bottom of a window well – every time it rained heavy, the window well filled up and the water POURED through the dryer vent. What genius installed that? And two of the basement rooms were carpeted, which was just loads of fun when the water came pouring in. Whoever installed the new flooring had managed to cut ALL of the telephone wires at floor level. I realize most people don’t use a landline much anymore, but we still do – for both phone and DSL internet – so that was obnoxious. Needed a new roof, new gutters, etc. There’s also been a whole series of plumbing issues.

I think we’ve solved all the flip-related issues, but there’s always something else that needs repair of maintenance. Now we need a new deck, new kitchen flooring, paint, landscaping, etc.

answered 1 week ago

One project at a time. Fix the leaks first. Clean the mold up and then move on to the next one. Houses like this are a pain but it’s all fixable. I did a complete flip in April. Took me three months of project after project. Got it all done and the monkey is off my back. Good luck.

answered 1 week ago

Sounds like the Tom Hanks movie “The Money Pit”

answered 7 days ago

Been there done that. Get what you can done and list it. Market is hot right now and it’s a good time to sell.

answered 7 days ago

Take one thing at a time. Chances are, when you fix one thing, it may fix others as well. Good luck! Enjoy the experience!

answered 7 days ago

Sorry for the luck. Let it be a lesson about flipped houses. Some are good, many others aren’t. Learn as much as you can don’t be afraid to try things, but know when something may be a little to much for you to do because some thing if you mess it up will only give you a headache. Call a professional and watch them if a youtube video isn’t good enough.

answered 7 days ago

All houses come with problems and if they don’t, they will.
Garbage work is a pain to deal with, but keep truckin you’ll get it all handled…. then something else will break

answered 7 days ago

We have one of those houses but we are getting there. Life keeps getting in the way and lack of time. We bought my parents 40 year old home that had no updates. We are waiting anxiously for a hail storm to help replace the roof…..ha! Had water issues in the basement that were fixed except for one and we just said the heck with it and just put down water absorbers for when it randomly leaks. Oh well, all is getting done and we are liking the results. You will too. Eventually!

answered 7 days ago

Run. No, really…run fast. First off, was any of this pointed out at time of inspection? What state do you live in? I may have some input. We purchased a flip with same issues. I can PM you the whole story and what we were told.

answered 7 days ago

For all of you thinking about buying a flipped house-don’t; unless you check that any building, electrical, heating and plumbing permits were obtained and inspections done and approved. A lot of these homes are like lipstick on a pig-and the pig ends up costing the new owner lots of money and headaches.

answered 7 days ago

Did you have a building inspection done?
Maybe get someone in who can diagnose the causes and maybe you can still fix some of it yourself?

answered 7 days ago

Yep we downsized from house and got a trailer but we discovered issues and so does money and on s.s.

answered 6 days ago

Any house is going to have issues, even new construction, it’s just a part of life. You fix what you can, and you learn from it.
While some flippers do shady stuff most don’t, what they do is fix the glaring issues and the cosmetic stuff, it’s still up to the home buyer to decide if the home is worth it or not.
Just take a deep breath and think of how lucky you are to own a home in this crazy economy, and if that doesn’t work take a sledge hammer to a wall (non load bearing of course) and spend a few days watching YouTube videos on how to fix it up and make it better than before.

answered 6 days ago

Take one thing at a time, preferably small ones first that way you can get the confidence going and have some accomplishments under your belt but most of all, just breathe. If you have questions regarding plumbing feel free to shoot me a message. I’ll try to help you out the best I can.

answered 6 days ago

When did you move in??? I haven’t seen you but you have to be here? Maybe you’re under the leaky drain or uneven floors

answered 6 days ago

Yep! Mine wasn’t even priced as a fixer up, BUT it’s 1964 so it is def an issue. I figured we only had to fix ‘a few things’, but a 3 year old roof started leaking this last summer, then I got a flood from the ac condensation line running through the wall and into the attic by fall, leaking toilets, replaced both rubber rings, pool surface now chipping up after 2 years in the house, house paint magically started peeling off the house after 1 year of us being here, my master bathtub literally cracked the first time I took a bath in the tub (and I am only 130 lbs lol) but the previous owner didn’t use foam undet the tub. Not only the crack in the tub, she had the tub installed with the back rest against the toilet, just ewwwww, so I have to bleach the tub to even think to get in it, so need to just gut the bathroom. The kids bathroom the tile was installed so uneven that one side of the toilet is off the floor haha. This house is a hot mess. I am just TIRED, but can’t find anything in South Florida that fits what I really want under 550k and not feasible right now. 😭

answered 6 days ago

Remember people flip to make a quick profit, and some people don’t know what they are doing

answered 6 days ago

Mine wasn’t flipped but her fiancé died in the house during renovations so everything was done fast and half assed to sell asap. Mostly cosmetic stuff but holy crap it is costing me to make the house presentable again.

answered 6 days ago

Save money on redos hire yourself a professional and learn from the professional.

answered 6 days ago

In Arizona any house new or used has to come with a one year warranty no matter how old it is. Most sellers usually buy an insurance policy that covers everything for at least one year.

answered 6 days ago

Yep. Kind of a money pit if you plan to live in these things. My wife and I ha e decided to forever buy land and build from scratch from this point on.

answered 6 days ago

Ask for plumbing , elec and waterproofing cert.

answered 6 days ago

Hang in there! We bought a house for the same reason….all of the copper piping was stolen and we needed a new well, electrical work, plumbing, roof, siding and SO many issues with it being a functional space. 6 years later and many tears, its the house of our dreams! Just make a list and take it one thing at a time.

answered 6 days ago

I feel your pain! About the time I get something started something else breaks, falls apart, or needs immediate attention of some sort. I’m putting mine back up for sale I don’t have the time or interest to do it all right now 😂

answered 6 days ago

We paid for a full house inspection. They gave a detailed “punch list” that made all repairs, code issues clear and orderly to tackle

answered 6 days ago

Our first newly built house was like this. Hired a capable handyman who could not believe he was remodeling a new house. Workmanship was nonexistent.

answered 6 days ago

Start one thing at a time with whats most important (non cosmetic) and what you can afford. With homeownership there will always be something to fix or do but don’t let things go till they turn into more expensive problems!I was pretty overwhelmed when we bought our home as well because we decided to do so much at once cosmetically so when actually things broke I felt like it was too much . I had a few moments where I was hating my house, but now at the end of the road of our Reno I love it! Its not perfect but its my home

answered 6 days ago

One thing at a time and start with what I call foundation issues, the things that will cause more issues if left unattended. The leaky sink should be an easy fix. If it’s a drain issue take all that apart and replace or clean and reseal. If its leaking where the sink meets the counter get some silicone and seal the gap. If the sink itself has a leak replace it, and dont go overboard, get a used one free or cheap, you may end up doing a whole kitchen reno later if it really needs a lot of work anyway. The settling floors concerns me most. Get an engineer out to do an inspection. How old is the house? What was done that made it start to settle more? To fix that the floor will need to be jacked up and new supports put in place. Dont just use some leveling compound, it will add more weight and potentially make the issue worse. You say you need a retaining wall. What needs to be retained and why? Could that be effecting the house? If so I would start there.