I\’m in the process of buying a home. It was

DWQA QuestionsI\’m in the process of buying a home. It was

I’m in the process of buying a home. It was built in 1962 and still has many original features. The architecture of the home is clearly midcentury modern. I’m not a fan of midcentury modern decor. Will it devalue the home to update with fixtures that are more traditional?
In addition to the photos here, the house has no overhead lighting outside of the kitchen. All lighting comes from wall sconces that are midcentry modern originals. Is it going to be detrimental to the integrity of the home to take all of those out and have overhead lighting put in?

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13 Answers
Best Answer
answered 1 month ago

I’m not trying to be rude, but that really isn’t mid-century, it’s just outdated (I say that as someone remodeling a very similar home)
Unless you know the architect of the home and their has been a coffee table book made of his work your safe to remodel as you please.
That said it’s a lot easier to update the existing bones of the home than to gut it and start over, by that I mean window and door placement and size, the brick, and the beam placement are all part of the homes character, that doesn’t mean you can’t or shouldn’t update them.
Modern farmhouse decor works great on 50’s-60s homes- white wash all that brick, keep any hardwood floors, a lot of 60’s light fixtures can be painted black to fit a farm house style.
Just go with what you like!

answered 1 month ago

We have a mid century modern built in the 60s too. I’d update everything you posted to your taste. Modern and mid century modern go well together. It’s when you start trying to mix in other styles that things look a bit off. I’d had no problem with anything you listed. It won’t devalue the house. Modernize all the fixtures and get rid of the paneling.

answered 1 month ago

If you’re buying it do what you want. I see some features that would be considered mcm but most of it is just 1960s standard. You won’t ruin anything by adding updated lighting, fixtures, flooring or plumbing. We built our home three years ago and my wife already has me changing stuff.

answered 1 month ago

Be sensitive to the original, without being beholden to it to drive too many of your choices. Anything original that you remove, sell it in one of the MCM groups, so someone else has a chance to own something they love.

I’d really suggest spending on a couple of hours with a good designer who understands the difference between MCM and MCR, or Mid Century Ranch. You have the latter, with a few touches of the former. You need a master plan for what’s staying and what’s going. Many of the Pinterest spackle and chewing gum fixes won’t be worth the effort wasted on them. It will be better to buy new doors than to try to fill them. Plus, the kitchen really need a remodel, not a tweak. It’s inefficient, and isn’t laid out with utility and safety in mind.

Speckling is the same with the paneling. Either paint it and love the cottagey feel that will give, or remove it and drywall it. Drywall is cheap.

Distinguish between a “for now shortcut” issue, vs a “have to change it to work or be safe”, and “we would really like to”. Set a low budget cap for the low price cosmetic issues, so the things that are more invasive and costly can take most of your time and money. Good luck! —Kitchen and Bath Designer of 22 years.

answered 1 month ago

If this is a neighborhood of homes with architectural significance modifications can affect the value. Most of those are on the west coast. I happen to like it, could we see a shot of the wall sconces? I would ditch the ceiling tiles before the ceiling lights are installed. That scalloped range hood is interesting, was that added to a standard hood? I serviced NuTone products back then and have never seen this in their catalog.

answered 1 month ago

The high windows, and the bedroom sconces. The living room and family room sconces are a black metal with tiny punched holes in patterns.

answered 1 month ago

1960s were not known for craftsmanship as earlier homes were. Do what you like to update it.

answered 1 month ago

update but do so carefully😢. i personally love a modern look with a midcentury vibe. if you can keep certain things please do it! i do not think traditional works well in midcentury mod…i mean you can do it but i try to go with the design/layout of the house. my home is a colonial as much as i love modern design i just Have to stick with a traditional look!

answered 1 month ago

You can update to be a mid century modern look that is more appealing to you. There are some fantastic mid century modern themes … but it isn’t sticking out in this home. Definitely get rid of a pink bathroom. Study Houzz.com for ideas

answered 1 month ago

I’d keep the hot pink shower for sure.

answered 1 month ago

I wouldn’t be the least bit concerned. Sell the stuff you don’t like to someone who prefers that style, and make your home work for you. If it was a designer built classic it would be different, but that sixties style isn’t unique and I wouldn’t worry about it. Make your house your own, make it work for you and don’t worry about saving anything you don’t like. We have a 1985 cedar chalet and it’s dated and dark, we’re keeping to the overall theme but updating what doesn’t work for us. It’s our house, it needs to function for our family.

answered 1 month ago

Mid century homes now qualify for restoration Grant’s. There is a substantial following for fixtures, etc. Looks like a great house.

answered 1 month ago

My house was built in 1955, I’m antique aficianado & I love history, not speaking for myself valuewise but I’ve been really torn on keeping it as is or upgrading. I have decided to upgrade with new things that look old. I think bringing things up to date definetely adds value if anything, nobody wants to see that awful wood paneling on the walls anymore