Hello. I am laying new kitchen tile, size 8×8, and

DWQA QuestionsHello. I am laying new kitchen tile, size 8×8, and

Hello. I am laying new kitchen tile, size 8×8, and in taking out the destroyed laminate floor, I found this as an underlayment. I am wondering if I can tile on top of it, or is it best to rip it up and go with cement board? The second picture is for reference, to see the OG subfloor with the underlayment on top. What would you suggest?? Thanks for your feedback.

Hello. I am laying new kitchen tile, size 8x8, and 1 Hello. I am laying new kitchen tile, size 8x8, and 2

14 Answers
Best Answer
answered 2 months ago

I like to use Hardy Board. But yes take all that shit off the floor. Then walk around the room to find squeaky spots. Use ring nails or screws to hit a joist below. Then put your hardy board or durarock with the correct screws. This will keep your floor from flexing under the tile when you walk on it. That’s what cracks them and makes them pop loose. That and your mortar mix not being wet enough.

answered 2 months ago

The reason you lay backer board is to keep the house movement from cracking the tile and grout yes that 1/4 Liam is fine then I’d use a 1/4 backer board cement, use the backer screws use a mastic under the cement board to increase the popping and cracking noise under the floor and sweep clean and vacuum the floor before hand it’s very crucial to the process.

answered 2 months ago

When we laid tiles in our house several years ago we decided to go directly over our subfloor and my cousin who is a builder said that that was fine except for the fact that we would see random cracks here in there and tiles there were probably less than five in 1000 ft.² so it depends on whether or not you wanna take a chance on that

answered 2 months ago

Cement board. Or you get a cracked mess

answered 2 months ago

I’d pull all the baseboard and quarter round off, strip down to subfloor, install 3/8″ durarock, then tile. Leaving 1/4″ luan on floor raises floor height slightly yet transition into adjoining rooms is affected.

answered 2 months ago

If subfloor is sturdy under overlay 1/4″ durarock is sufficient.

answered 2 months ago

If at transitions there is a height difference they make a “T” cap for that. H/D Lowe’s

answered 2 months ago

Hi. I’d absolutely take that luan up. It delaminates very easily with moisture and has no use but for maybe going under glue down sheet vinyl floor. As others said, take it up, vacuum and scrape floor very well, then mortar down 1/4” cement board just use a 1/4×1/4 trowel that’s plenty of bond then you can just nail down with hot dip galvanized roofing nails. Screws rip the cement board and sometimes crack it so I personally find that nails are best since the bond is ultimately coming from the mortar. Just read the specs I’m pretty sure wonder board lists nailing as acceptable but hardy board might not idk. If your old subfloor is only 3/4” or if the house is old and creaky I would even consider glueing and screwing down more plywood. If you use a good quality plywood and don’t use cheap liquid nail (use PL) you’ll considerably increase the strength of your floor and eliminate pops and cracks. Nothing wrong with bonding the tile directly to the plywood.

answered 2 months ago

Even a better product than using backer board it would be schluter ditra you live with mortar right over the quarter inch Luan that’s there you just fill in the spots that are missing where you’re putting tile

answered 2 months ago

Do not install over that. Remove it and use cement board or an uncoupling membrane. install using thin set. If floor has deflection I wouldn’t install tile

answered 2 months ago

Must use cement or your tiles will crack as the boards underneath expand and contract

answered 2 months ago

Thank you for the feedback. I have discovered that under the Luan is the even older vinyl, with a nice thick layer of thinset between the two. I can scrape all of that up, although, I really really don’t want to. The other option seems to be cement board on top of Luan, which is also not a great prospect, due to what I believe will be a pretty incredible transition difference to the adjoining rooms, that I will hate looking at. So, of the two I guess I will go with the first option. Any suggestions on getting up that laminate and thinset?

answered 2 months ago

Lift it all up see what sort of floor is there wood or solid

answered 2 months ago

Can’t lay a tile floor directly on wood or old paint. One of that main advantages of cement board is that wood and tile expand a contract at different rates. Also consider laying the tile using “Flex” thinset. It is more tolerant of wide temperature and humidity variations.